Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area

Located deep in the South Rupununi, Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area (COCA) is the set amid the headwaters of the Essequibo River and the Wassarai, Yahore, Komoa and Kaiawakua Mountains. Spread over 625,000 hectares, this region is considered one of the last pristine rainforests with unmatched biodiversity. The conservation area is managed by the local Wai Wai community, who have inhabited this land for generations. The Masakenari community of the Wai Wais who live here, have a deep spiritual, cultural and social connection with the land. They practice shifting cultivation, clearing the forest for agro practices, and keeping soil rejuvenation at the core to maintain the fragile tropical rainforest ecosystem. The tall highland forests and clean, unpolluted waters of the region are home to a remarkable diversity of fish. There is a healthy population of giant river otters, capybaras, and a few species of caiman. Large mammals such as jaguars, tapirs, bush dogs, giant anteaters, and saki monkeys are still common. Over 400 species of birds have been reported from the region, and the diversity of reptiles and amphibians are similarly rich. As the first legally protected community-owned conservation area in Guyana, Konashen has paved the way for many more.

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Welcome to
Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area

Located deep in the South Rupununi, Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area (COCA) is the set amid the headwaters of the Essequibo River and the Wassarai, Yahore, Komoa and Kaiawakua Mountains. Spread over 625,000 hectares, this region is considered one of the last pristine rainforests with unmatched biodiversity. The conservation area is managed by the local Wai Wai community, who have inhabited this land for generations. The Masakenari community of the Wai Wais who live here, have a deep spiritual, cultural and social connection with the land. They practice shifting cultivation, clearing the forest for agro practices, and keeping soil rejuvenation at the core to maintain the fragile tropical rainforest ecosystem. The tall highland forests and clean, unpolluted waters of the region are home to a remarkable diversity of fish. There is a healthy population of giant river otters, capybaras, and a few species of caiman. Large mammals such as jaguars, tapirs, bush dogs, giant anteaters, and saki monkeys are still common. Over 400 species of birds have been reported from the region, and the diversity of reptiles and amphibians are similarly rich. As the first legally protected community-owned conservation area in Guyana, Konashen has paved the way for many more.

Getting To And Around

Corriverton has ample connectivity with Georgetown via different modes of transportation that are easy to book.

Air

The closest airport to Corriverton is in Georgetown - Cheddi Jagan International Airport which connects the country to the rest of the world, and the Eugene F. Correia International Airport (formerly known as Ogle) which facilitates travel to Barbados, Suriname and other domestic locations such as Lethem. There are smaller airstrips located throughout the region, however you need special permission from the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority to charter a flight.

Road

This is the most popular mode for visiting Corriverton. Plenty of mini buses and taxis connect Georgetown to Corriverton. Many travellers opt to rent a vehicle to explore the landscape at their own leisurely pace. You get a chance to wend along the coastal road and stop at bustling village squares on the way. Keep in mind that you have to cross over the Berbice Bridge. You can view their daily retraction schedule here.

River

A few ferries ply between other coastal and riverside destinations and the Berbice region. New Amsterdam and Suriname are the major points of connections.

THINGS TO SEE AND DO

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