Acarai & Imataka Mountains

Running between Guyana and Brazil for over 130 kilometers, the low thickly forested Acarai Mountain range is one of the most pristine tracts of lowland tropical rainforest in the world. This seldom- traversed landscape has not been extensively researched. What is known is that the richness and abundance of species and habitats is extraordinary. Forming part of the northern watershed of the Amazon Basin, ecozones range from lowland forests and tropical rain forest to a high point at 2000 feet above sea level. The pristine mountain range is the source to headwaters of the Essequibo River, the longest river in Guyana, and the Corentye River as well. It is sparsely populated and only home to the Wai Wai Peoples who steward the landscape and retain their unique cultural heritage.

Located on the north western edge of the country, bordering Venezuela, the Imataka Mountains are extremely rich in natural resources. Covered in dense forest, they have a healthy ecosystem that is home to a diversity of wildlife and avian species. This mountain range is the source of the tributaries of the Orinoco River in Venezuela and Guyana’s Cuyuni and Mazaruni Rivers, which flow into the Essequibo. Additionally, it is the epicenter for a wealth of water and mineral resources, including gold and diamonds.

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Acarai & Imataka Mountains

Running between Guyana and Brazil for over 130 kilometers, the low thickly forested Acarai Mountain range is one of the most pristine tracts of lowland tropical rainforest in the world. This seldom- traversed landscape has not been extensively researched. What is known is that the richness and abundance of species and habitats is extraordinary. Forming part of the northern watershed of the Amazon Basin, ecozones range from lowland forests and tropical rain forest to a high point at 2000 feet above sea level. The pristine mountain range is the source to headwaters of the Essequibo River, the longest river in Guyana, and the Corentye River as well. It is sparsely populated and only home to the Wai Wai Peoples who steward the landscape and retain their unique cultural heritage.

Located on the north western edge of the country, bordering Venezuela, the Imataka Mountains are extremely rich in natural resources. Covered in dense forest, they have a healthy ecosystem that is home to a diversity of wildlife and avian species. This mountain range is the source of the tributaries of the Orinoco River in Venezuela and Guyana’s Cuyuni and Mazaruni Rivers, which flow into the Essequibo. Additionally, it is the epicenter for a wealth of water and mineral resources, including gold and diamonds.

Getting To And Around

Access Acarai Mountains via air with connectivity to Georgetown. Regional buses and boat services on the Corentyne River are also available.

Air

The easiest way to access the Acarai Mountains is to charter a small plane from the Eugene F. Correia International Airport in Georgetown to the small airstrip in Gunns. It is also possible to fly into airstrips in the South Rupununi or Lethem and overland from there. Whether you wish to fly or overland, you will need permission from the Wai Wai to visit their titled lands. Travelling with Bushmasters, Rupununi Trails or Wilderness Explorers is the best bet for securing permission.

Road

Regional buses, private minibuses and 4x4 vehicles can get you closest to Acarai Mountains from one of the surrounding villages. Bushmasters or link Rupununi Trails would be able to advise you as to the best option based on your budget and the time you have available.

River

You can travel along the Corentyne River to meet to the base of the mountain. Though this is a rarely travelled route, river expeditions are available through Rupununi Trails.

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